Sesame Crusted Salmon Rice Bowl

Salmonbowl

Watch me make this recipe on my YouTube Channel!

Yield: 4 servings

 

Sauce

2 tablespoons mirin

4 teaspoons unsweetened rice wine vinegar

1 tablespoon soy sauce

 

Mix together in a small bowl. Set aside.

 

Bowl Ingredients

2 cups cooked rice (your choice e.g. sushi, brown, forbidden)

4-ounces small carrots, (approximately 2 small carrots) peeled into ribbons with a vegetable peeler

3-ounces cucumbers (Persian or English), (approximately 1 cucumber) thinly sliced

12 seaweed squares (your favorite brand or seaweed snack)

2 teaspoons Nori Komi furikake (use toasted sesame seeds if you don’t have it)

4 teaspoons pickled ginger

1 avocado, cut in half lengthwise, pitted and cut into slices

1-ounce scallion, (1 scallion), dark green part and root end cut off, sliced thinly on a bias

 

Salmon

1 pound wild Alaskan sockeye salmon, preferably Copper River Salmon, skin on, pin bones removed, cut into 4 equal sized pieces, 1-inch thick

2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

½ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons white sesame seeds

2 tablespoons black sesame seeds

 

Pat the fish dry (all sides) with a paper towel.

Lightly oil salmon with ½ teaspoon olive oil. Use fingers to ensure oil is evenly coating the flesh. Season flesh side of salmon pieces evenly with salt and pepper.

Place sesame seeds on a plate.

Gently press flesh side of salmon into plate of sesame seeds to coat the flesh.

Add remaining 1½ teaspoons oil to a medium nonstick sauté pan and place over medium heat. Let pan heat until hot, approximately 2 minutes. Swirl to coat bottom of pan with the oil. Place fish (cook all 4 pieces at a time if pan is large enough), sesame seed side down into pan and let cook until golden brown, approximately 2 minutes. Flip fish and continue cooking for 2 to 3 minutes until skin is crispy and salmon changes in color from bright pink and translucent to opaque and coral.

Remove from pan and transfer to a plate. Remove skin before serving if you wish.

 

Bowl Assembly

To assemble the bowl, divide the rice among 4 bowls. Sprinkle ½ teaspoon of furikake over each portion of rice. Arrange carrots, cucumbers, avocado, scallions and pickled ginger on top of the rice. Drizzle sauce over each portion, to taste. Place 3 seaweed sheets upright against the side of the bowl and lay a piece of salmon atop each bowl, sesame seed side up.

Serve immediately.

My Seafood Hero

When I grow up, I want to be just like Bun Lai of Miya’s Sushi!

Bun is a sustainable seafood ambassador and sushi chef and his restaurant is one of the first sustainable sushi restaurants in the country and has the largest vegetarian sushi menu in the world. Bun is doing amazing, innovative and imaginative things at Miya’s and is leading the pack when it comes to preserving, sustaining and fortifying the environment.

Today we are filming at Miya’s for an episode of Good Food America. We began by diving off the shore to forage for seaweed and clams and are now in the middle of cooking it up in the kitchen of Miya’s!

Thanks so much for having us, Bun.

You are definitely my hero.

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A Lyon Dreams of Sushi

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Inspired by the movie, Jiro Dreams of Sushi, that my sous and I recently enjoyed, this morning we headed to downtown L.A. and took a fantastic 3 & 1/2 hour sushi making class at the Sushi Institute of America. Also joining us was my sous’ sister, Karen, and our best friend, Scott – a master sushi lover.

There’s something so wonderful about the simplicity of sushi. I totally understand how the sushi greats, (like Jiro, his son and kitchen staff) train their whole lives in this art. Making the rice is a science in and of itself: the traditional method to clean it, the right ratio of rice and water, the mixture for the sweet/salty rice vinegar, stirring with the proper technique, fanning the rice to cool it, and so on – this one task alone can take years upon years to master.

The more and more we practiced and learned, the further perfection seemed.

I can only imagine how a sushi master must just ‘feel’ when it’s the right amount of rice in their hands for making a roll or the nigiri (when the fish is on top of a mound of rice). To begin to play with that delicate balance was very exciting for all of us. And the results? Snacks, rolls, and pieces of sashimi and sushi all along the way!

We also learned how to make dashi (fish stock made from seaweed and dried tuna) and miso soup. In fact, we ended up making so much sushi that, upon going home, we had to walk to the neighborhood bookstore to share our feast with our friend Tim (one of the tasters for my cookbook – he actually gave so much feedback that he’s IN the book). We armed him with some soy sauce, a pair of chopsticks and off he went.

Every grain of rice has a purpose. Every motion, every slice, every… delicious bite. The only downside to today’s class, if you can call it that, was the self inflicted sushi coma, which I quickly overcame with the aid of my best buddy, Latte.

You never know, tonight I think I may have some dreams of sushi of my own.