Happy World Oceans Day

Happy World Oceans Day!I hopped around the US today via satellite (this morning) to talk about one of my favorite subjects: sustainable seafood!

Check out my spot from San Diego Living
http://www.cw6sandiego.com/love-seafood-responsibly/

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Choose Sustainable Seafood to CELEBRATE World Oceans Day!

LYONMBA

Cooking at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by billcoggin.com

Happy World Oceans Day (Wednesday, June 8)! Celebrate with me (on this great day and in the future) by choosing to buy / enjoy sustainable seafood. Sustainable seafood is seafood that is caught or farmed in ways that are friendlier to the environment. And finding it is easy –  just download the Seafood Watch App which tells you what seafood is a best choice and what to avoid. E-A-S-Y!!!

To spread the word about the Seafood Watch App and sustainable seafood,  I will be beamed into your TV sets Wednesday morning/afternoon to get this World Ocean’s Day party started and share some easy and delicious sustainable seafood recipes. If you live in one of these cities – tune in on Wednesday and I’ll see you soon!

Times are in EST (Eastern Standard Time)

8:40-8:50    NORFOLK    WGNT-CW
9:00-9:05    NATIONAL  NEWSWATCH
9:10-9:20     WEST PALM BEACH    WPBF-ABC
9:20-9:30    GREENSBORO    WGHP-FOX
9:30-9:35     NATIONAL    FOX NEWSEDGE
9:40-9:45     CHARLOTTE    WCNC-NBC
9:45 – 9:55   LOUISVILLE    WAVE-NBC
9:55-10:05    ROANOKE    WFXR-FOX
10:05-10:10   RICHMOND    WTVR-CBS
10:10-10:20   NATIONAL    COFFEE WITH AMERICA
10:20-10:30  ATLANTA    CONNTV
10:40-10:50  WASHINGTON DC    WJLA-ABC
11:30-11:35    TUCSON    KGUN-ABC & KWBA/CW
12:10-12:20   SAN DIEGO    XETV-CW
12:20-12:30   SACRAMENTO    KTXL-FOX
12:30-12:40   MADISON    WBUW-CW

Tsukiji Fish Market. Tokyo, Japan

Super Sous and I are in Tokyo, Japan – mainly to visit the Tsukiji (skee-jee) Fish Market before it moves location after 80+ years. We had to experience this piece of history! It is hard to put into words the experience of walking through this maze of seafood, but we tried to capture a little bit of it for you…

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Wild Dungeness Crab Stew

It’s a one pot wonder, it’s delicious, healthy, sustainable and it’ll serve a family, dinner party or just yourself – for many meals. What more could you ask for?

Wild Dungeness Crab Stew

Wild Dungeness Crab Stew

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

2 medium yellow onions, peeled and diced small

1 fennel bulb, cored and diced medium

4 celery stalks, cut into thirds lengthwise and diced small

6 carrots, peeled and chopped roughly

¼ teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

6 garlic cloves, peeled and minced

2 teaspoons Old Bay Seasoning

3 cups corn kernels

2 ½ cups lima beans

2 (14-ounce) cans diced tomatoes, preferably fire-roasted

1 pound Yukon Gold potatoes, spots or greening removed and diced medium

4 cups vegetable stock

5 sprigs thyme, tied together with the bay leaves (use butcher’s twine)

2 bay leaves, tied together with the thyme sprigs (use butcher’s twine)

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1 pound Dungeness crab meat

Fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley, for garnish

In a 5.5 quart pot, set over medium heat, add the olive oil and the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 to 10 minutes, until the onions are soft, translucent, and lightly caramelized.

Add the fennel and celery. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 6 to 8 minutes, until the celery and fennel begin to soften.

Add the carrots, salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally for 6 to 8 minutes until the carrots begin to soften.

Add the garlic and the Old Bay seasoning and cook until fragrant, approximately 1 minute.

Add the corn, lima beans, tomatoes, potatoes, stock, and herb bundle. Simmer for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are just cooked through.

Turn off the heat. Add the Worcestershire sauce and stir to combine.

Add the crab, gently stir to combine and adjust the seasoning with additional salt and pepper.

Remove and discard herb bundle and serve stew in bowls garnished with some hand torn parsley.

Eat Tilapia

Being a Sustainable Seafood Ambassador with the Monterey Bay Aquarium and knowing that many of the large fish in the ocean are being fished to near extinction (e.g. bluefin tuna, chilean sea bass, marlin…), I began doing a little research into aquaculture, as a sustainable alternative.

What I have been discovering, however, is that aquaculture can be equally unsustainable.

For example:

  • to make 1 pound of farmed salmon, you need 2 to 5 pounds of smaller fish (fished from the ocean) to feed that salmon.
  • Many times the fish are overcrowded and this can lead to disease and then the inevitable use of antibiotics. (Sounds like a familiar practice used on land?)
  • On top of that, since fish farming happens around the world, even though the FDA may have banned some of the antibiotics (deeming them unsafe for use), these drugs may end up on your plate as regulations in other countries differ.
  • Sometimes the fish farms are in pens in the ocean and are very susceptible to being destroyed by the elements, e.g. a storm. When the fish escape it can be devastating to the natural habitat as the fish may be diseased (not to mention there are now GMO salmon being farmed).

So, what farmed seafood is safe?

Tilapia is a great choice because it is an herbivore so it does not need fishing to sustain it. It can also be raised in close quarters and is quite resilient to disease.  Shellfish, like oysters and clams, is another good option as they are raised in the ocean and actually clean/filter the ocean water. The farming is extremely sustainable, causing beneficial effects to the environment rather than depleting it.

The best thing you can do is research and ask questions. Grab your Latte and go have a chat with your local fishmonger. Find out where the fish you are buying comes from and how it was caught. You can also ask these questions when you go out to eat.

There are sustainably caught fish and farming practices. We just have to ask the right questions and cast our vote with our dollar.

 

Size Doesn’t Matter

No matter how big or small it is, shopping at your local farmers market is one of the greatest experiences in life (and made even greater when paired with a double shot Latte).

Today, Super-sous and I went to one of our favorite local markets which consists of about 6 or 7 produce stands. It may be small (for California standards), but not having been to/shopped at a farmers market for the past 8 weeks, it was heaven, and we were able to stock up on some of the basics, to hold us over for the next few days.

I bought a beautiful 2 pound filet of line-caught Morro Bay salmon yesterday, so Super-sous and I are going to do some recipe creation which will involve some of the following ingredients (used over various dishes): dinosaur kale, fennel, peas, avocado, golden raisins, shallot, garlic, mint, thyme, rosemary, oregano, lemon and lemon zest, burrata cheese, goat cheese, and a lot of extra virgin olive oil.

With so many fresh, local ingredients, the kitchen is just begging for a piece of the action. Time to cook!