Veggie Burger

It’s summertime and that means burgers! Therefore, for our next Drought Friendly Recipe, we bring you a delicious, hearty and umami packed (thank you, mushrooms) veggie burger. This recipes makes thirteen 1/4 pound burgers. Now, if it were beef we were using, that would mean a serious water footprint. According to the LA Times, it takes 1,799 gallons of water to make 1 pound of beef. So, again, if this recipe were using beef, it would take a little over 5,800 gallons of water to produce thirteen 1/4 pound burgers. Good thing this recipe is comprised of veggies and grains. When you calculate the water footprint of this recipe as is, it comes out to something around 800 gallons of water or around 1/7 of the water used for a beef burger. So, how about swapping in this recipe for your next burger night? Bonus: you can make the burger mix in advance and then cook the pattys off when the time comes. Enjoy!

veggie onions

Spreading out the caramelized onion on a parchment-lined sheet tray to cool

veggie burger mushroom

1/2 batch of quartered mushrooms ready for pulsing

mushrooms chopped veggie burger

Good texture for the mushrooms

mushroom onions veggie burger

Spreading the roasted mushrooms over the cooled caramelized onions

rice lentil veggie burger

Rice/Bulgur/Lentil mixture

spices veggie burger

Spices!

veggie burger

Brushing the burgers with oil before putting them in the pan

Veggie Burger Overhead

Time to eat.

Drought Friendly Veggie Burgers

Yield: 13 burgers

 

¼ cup grapeseed oil, divided, plus more for brushing

1 large yellow onion, peeled and diced small (2 cups)

1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided, plus more to taste

20 large cloves garlic, peeled and chopped roughly (1/2 cup)

24-ounces cremini mushrooms, quartered

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided, plus more to taste

4 cups vegetable stock

¼ cup white jasmine rice

½ cup black (beluga) lentils

¾ cup bulgur

1 (15-ounce) can black beans, undrained

1 cup panko

1 tablespoon dried Greek oregano

½ teaspoon chipotle powder

1 tablespoon soy sauce

2 tablespoons vegan worcestershire sauce

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon ground fennel

1 teaspoon ground cumin

The Fixin’s:

13 burger buns

13 large slices tomato

Lettuce (your choice!)

Pickled shallots

Organic ketchup, no question

Dijon mustard, gotta’ have mustard too

 

Place an oven rack to the upper position and preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

Add the onion, 2 tablespoons oil and ¼ teaspoon salt to a medium (3½ quart) saucepan and place over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for approximately 8 minutes until onions are translucent and just beginning to brown. Stir in the garlic and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, for an additional 5 minutes. Remove from heat and spread the onion mixture over a parchment-lined sheet tray to cool. Do not wash the saucepan.

In a food processor, pulse half the mushrooms until finely chopped, approximately 30 quick pulses. Transfer mushrooms to a medium mixing bowl and pulse the remaining mushrooms in the same way. Transfer remaining mushrooms to the medium mixing bowl. Do not wash food processor.

Stir to combine the chopped mushrooms with 2 tablespoons of grapeseed oil, ¼ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper.

Spread the mushrooms evenly over a parchment-lined sheet tray. Transfer sheet tray to the oven and bake for 30 minutes, stirring once after 15 minutes. Remove the sheet tray from the oven and evenly spread the mushrooms over the onions to cool to room temperature.

In the same medium (3½ quart) saucepan used for the onion mixture, add the stock. Place over high heat and bring to a boil. Add rice, black lentils, bulgur, black beans (with liquid), ½ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon black pepper. Stir to combine and bring to a boil again. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat to low, and simmer for 15 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes (scraping the bottom of the pan to prevent burning). Remove from the heat and drain excess liquid using a fine mesh strainer. Spread strained rice mixture evenly over a parchment-lined sheet tray and cool to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, using a fork, stir to combine the cooked mushrooms, cooked rice mixture, panko, dried oregano, chipotle powder, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, fennel and cumin. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Put half of the mixture into a food processor and pulse 15 times until mixture is well combined. Transfer the processed batch back into the large mixing bowl and stir everything together until well mixed.

Using a ½ cup measuring cup, measure out ½ cup of mixture per burger, shaping the burgers with your hands into 4-inch (diameter) patties. Set each burger on a parchment-lined sheet tray and brush the top of each burger evenly with some oil.

Heat a large non-stick pan over medium heat for 3 minutes. Transfer the prepared burgers, oil side down, into the pan and cook undisturbed for 3 minutes. Brush the second side of the burgers with oil and then flip the burgers over. Continue to cook for an additional 3 minutes. Transfer the cooked burgers to a parchment-lined sheet tray and bake for 10 minutes. Flip the burgers and continue to bake for an additional 10 minutes.

Remove the sheet tray from the oven. Serve burgers on buns with tomato slices, lettuce, pickled shallots, ketchup and mustard.

Turkey Stuffing Burger

Because sometimes you can’t wait until Thanksgiving to have turkey and stuffing.

Turkey Stuffing Burger

Turkey Stuffing Burger

Yields: 4 burgers

 

1 medium yellow onion, chopped roughly (2 cups)

5-ounces button mushrooms, quartered

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

½ cup fresh corn (kernels)

3 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped roughly

2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh sage

1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley

2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh rosemary

¼ cup panko bread crumbs

¼ teaspoon red pepper (chile) flakes

1 ¼ teaspoon kosher salt

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

½ pound ground white turkey meat

 

Combine onion and mushrooms in a food processor and pulse 13 to 15 times until the mixture just begins to clump together.

In a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, add the olive oil and heat until shimmering, approximately 1 minute.

Add the onion mushroom mixture and cook, stirring occasionally, until most of the liquid is gone and the mixture is just beginning to caramelize, approximately 5 minutes.

Add the corn, garlic, and fresh herbs. Stir and continue cooking for another 3 minutes.

Add the panko, chile flakes, salt and pepper. Stir to combine and remove from heat.

Add contents of the sauté pan to a food processor and pulse 15 to 20 times until the mixture just begins to clump together. It will look like wet stuffing.

In a large bowl fold together the “stuffing” ingredients with the turkey.

Form 4 equal sized patties and place on a parchment-lined tray or plate in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.

Place an oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit.

Remove from refrigerator, transfer to a parchment lined sheet tray and bake, flipping the burgers once halfway through cooking, until the internal temperature of the burger reaches 160 degrees Fahrenheit (use a digital thermometer) approximately 25 minutes.

Place a large non stick saute pan over medium high heat and add 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil. Let sit over medium-high heat for 1 minute, until the oil shimmers. Add the burgers and flip after 30 seconds, just enough to sear the bottom side. Sear the opposite side for 30 seconds and remove from heat.

 

Burger Fixings:

4 toasted hamburger buns

¼ cup whole grain Dijon mustard, plus more to taste

¼ cup mayonnaise, plus more to taste

4 slices of tomato

handful of mixed greens

12 slices avocado

 

Spread mustard on bottom side of buns. Top each bun with turkey burger, tomato, 3 slices of avocado and some lettuce. Spread mayonnaise on top of buns. Put together and dig in.

 

Burgers, Gazpacho and Honey Vanilla Whipped Ricotta

Three bonus recipes for the week. Two on the Piedmont Healthcare website and one on the Livestrong website. They can also be found in my seasonal cookbook, Great Food Starts Fresh!

First, my Honey Vanilla Whipped Ricotta with Fresh Fruit:

Screen shot 2014-09-03 at 11.27.43 AM

 

Second, my Spicy Watermelon Gazpacho:

Screen shot 2014-09-03 at 11.53.01 AM

 

Finally, my Grilled Hamburger with Tomato Mostarda:

Screen shot 2014-09-03 at 11.55.23 AM

Recipe Review: Week of July 1

Just a reminder of the great recipes posted on my blog last week.

Time to get shopping!

Recipe Review Week July1

 

Grilled chicken thighs with homemade barbecue sauce (top lef)

Homemade barbecue sauce (left middle)

The bacon makes everything better burger (bottom left)

Tomatillo tomato salsa (top right)

German-style potato salad (bottom right)

Salmon Burgers with Homemade Tartar Sauce

Wild Alaskan salmon is in season! So, next time you purchase some salmon at your local grocery store or fish market, how about making my salmon burgers? They are easy to make and have a nice crispy outside on account of the panko. Mmmmmm.  Plus, the homemade tartar sauce is a delicious treat in and of itself! Sea for yourself! (Bonus: it’s a sustainable seafood dish!)

 

Salmon Burger Panko

Salmon burger in panko before cooking

Salmon Burger with Homemade Tartar Sauce

 

 

Salmon Burger with Homemade Tartar Sauce

Yield: 4 burgers

 

For the burger:

1 pound wild salmon filet, skin, bloodline and pinbones discarded, chopped finely

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley

2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme

½ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 teaspoons mayonnaise

1 ¼ cup panko bread crumbs, divided

1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

 

Place the salmon, mustard, lemon juice, herbs, salt, pepper, mayonnaise and ¼ cup panko in a large bowl. Using a rubber spatula, fold until well combined.

Place 1 cup panko on a plate.

Form 4 equal sized patties, approximately 3-inches in diameter and 1-inch thick, and press bottom of patties into the panko to coat. Do the same to the opposite side, pressing each patty into the panko.

Place burgers on a parchment-lined tray or plate.

Place a large nonstick sauté pan over medium high heat and add the 1/3 cup olive oil. Let sit over medium-high heat for 1 minute, until the oil shimmers (hot!). Add the burgers and let cook on each side for 1 minute and 30 seconds. Transfer to a paper towel lined plate.

Tartar Sauce:

¼ cup mayonnaise

2 tablespoons cornichon, diced small

½ teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 teaspoons white wine vinegar

½ teaspoon capers, rinsed and chopped roughly

2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh dill

kosher salt, to taste

freshly ground pepper, to taste

 

Add all ingredients to a small bowl and mix to combine. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

 

Burger Assembly:

Tartar sauce

Romaine or Butter Lettuce leaves

Toasted hamburger, optional

Place tartar sauce on bottom and top of hamburger buns and top with burger and lettuce. Alternately, you can eat your salmon burger in between lettuce leaves or on top of a bed of lettuce with tartar sauce drizzled overtop.

The Bacon Makes Everything Better Burger

If you’re gonna go for it, go for it, right? And bacon does make everything better, so why not blend it into your burger for the ultimate hickory smoked bacon burger? Who’s with me?!

The trick is to put your bacon meat through a grinder or chop it very, very finely. If you go for the chopping route, make sure your bacon is cold before you slice into it. It’ll make things easier. You can even throw it in the freezer for 10 minutes before chopping. Here’s what my bacon looked like after I gave it a really good chop. And I still went back for more chopping after this. The finer the better.

bacon chopped

 

Once you’ve got your bacon nice and fine, you’re ready to marry it with the beef. (Do I hear wedding bells?) I actually chopped it into my beef and folded the mixture, chopping and folding again and again to make sure it was well mixed and any larger bacon pieces were chopped fine. (Normally you wouldn’t want to fuss much with the ground meat to avoid overworking it, but because of the texture of the bacon and the amount of fat in the bacon, it didn’t seem to affect the final outcome.)

Okay, now you’re turn!

The Bacon Makes Everything Better Burger

 

The Bacon Makes Everything Better Burger

Yield: 4 sliders

 

For the burger:

¼ pound cold hickory smoked bacon, about 3 slices of bacon, put through a meat grinder or chopped very finely (you really can’t chop it too finely – chop, chop and chop again!)

¾ pound 85/15 organic grass fed ground beef

½ teaspoon grapeseed oil

1 batch of homemade barbecue sauce

4 slider buns, lightly toasted

4 slices of aged sharp cheddar

12 thin slices of dill pickles

2 tablespoons mayonnaise

 

Place an oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit.

Fold to mix together bacon and ground beef. Form 4 equal sized patties, 3-inches wide by 1-inch thick, and place on a parchment-lined sheet tray.

Bake, flipping the burgers at the 10-minute mark, until the internal temperature of the burger reaches 130 degrees Fahrenheit (use a digital thermometer), approximately 20 minutes.

Place a large sauté pan over medium high heat and add the grapeseed oil. Let pan sit over medium-high heat for a full minute, or until the oil just begins to smoke. Swirl the oil in the pan to coat the bottom evenly. Using a paper towel, dab the top of the burgers and add the burgers to the pan, dry side down, and cook for 45 seconds, just enough to sear the bottom side. Using a metal spatula, flip and sear the opposite side for another 45 seconds. Transfer burgers to a plate and let rest for 5 minutes.

Spread homemade barbecue sauce on bottom side of bun. Place burger on barbecue laden bun, add cheese and 3 slices of pickles each. Spread mayonnaise on top of bun. Put together and enjoy every bite.

Note: the USDA recommends that any ground meat be cooked until the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees Fahrenheit. That said, if you know where your meat comes from and who’s grinding it and you want a medium-rare or medium burger, like me, you may make the choice to do otherwise.